Empowering Women Through Investment (EWI)

News Updates
We believe in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women in today’s world. One key initiative that we are developing is the opportunity to educate, assist, and financially support younger, especially diverse, women as they learn financial planning and portfolio management. Our objective is to establish a female stock club that focuses on group learning, expansion of financial literacy, and group initiative on making investment decisions.

As a 2019 report from the TIAA Institute and Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) shows, African Americans constitute 13% and Latinos constitute about 15% of the American population and thus both groups play a critical role in the function, success, and sustainability of the economy in the U.S. today. Yet, compared to whites, African Americans and Latinos score significantly lower on the Personal Finance Index on eight indicators (earning, consuming, borrowing, saving, investing, insuring, understanding risk, and gathering information) by a measure of 38% (AAs/Latinos) to 55% (whites).

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Critically, the intersectional link for diverse women of color is even more pronounced as it relates to financial literacy and personal financial success. Women of color score significantly lower on these metrics by a measure of 17% to 26% compared to white women (and even worse compared to men). These gaps show that not only is there a real opportunity for women of color to benefit from financial investment programs and financial literacy initiatives, but that these impacts can be extended greatly to have a larger impact on the American economy generally.

Empowering Women Through Investment (EWI)

News Updates
We believe in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women in today’s world. One key initiative that we are developing is the opportunity to educate, assist, and financially support younger, especially diverse, women as they learn financial planning and portfolio management. Our objective is to establish a female stock club that focuses on group learning, expansion of financial literacy, and group initiative on making investment decisions.

Image
As a 2019 report from the TIAA Institute and Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) shows, African Americans constitute 13% and Latinos constitute about 15% of the American population and thus both groups play a critical role in the function, success, and sustainability of the economy in the U.S. today. Yet, compared to whites, African Americans and Latinos score significantly lower on the Personal Finance Index on eight indicators (earning, consuming, borrowing, saving, investing, insuring, understanding risk, and gathering information) by a measure of 38% (AAs/Latinos) to 55% (whites).

Critically, the intersectional link for diverse women of color is even more pronounced as it relates to financial literacy and personal financial success. Women of color score significantly lower on these metrics by a measure of 17% to 26% compared to white women (and even worse compared to men). These gaps show that not only is there a real opportunity for women of color to benefit from financial investment programs and financial literacy initiatives, but that these impacts can be extended greatly to have a larger impact on the American economy generally.

Empowering Women Through Investment (EWI)

News Updates
We believe in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women in today’s world. One key initiative that we are developing is the opportunity to educate, assist, and financially support younger, especially diverse, women as they learn financial planning and portfolio management. Our objective is to establish a female stock club that focuses on group learning, expansion of financial literacy, and group initiative on making investment decisions.

Image
As a 2019 report from the TIAA Institute and Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) shows, African Americans constitute 13% and Latinos constitute about 15% of the American population and thus both groups play a critical role in the function, success, and sustainability of the economy in the U.S. today. Yet, compared to whites, African Americans and Latinos score significantly lower on the Personal Finance Index on eight indicators (earning, consuming, borrowing, saving, investing, insuring, understanding risk, and gathering information) by a measure of 38% (AAs/Latinos) to 55% (whites).

Critically, the intersectional link for diverse women of color is even more pronounced as it relates to financial literacy and personal financial success. Women of color score significantly lower on these metrics by a measure of 17% to 26% compared to white women (and even worse compared to men). These gaps show that not only is there a real opportunity for women of color to benefit from financial investment programs and financial literacy initiatives, but that these impacts can be extended greatly to have a larger impact on the American economy generally.

Empowering Women Through Investment (EWI)

News Updates
We believe in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women in today’s world. One key initiative that we are developing is the opportunity to educate, assist, and financially support younger, especially diverse, women as they learn financial planning and portfolio management. Our objective is to establish a female stock club that focuses on group learning, expansion of financial literacy, and group initiative on making investment decisions.

As a 2019 report from the TIAA Institute and Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) shows, African Americans constitute 13% and Latinos constitute about 15% of the American population and thus both groups play a critical role in the function, success, and sustainability of the economy in the U.S. today. Yet, compared to whites, African Americans and Latinos score significantly lower on the Personal Finance Index on eight indicators (earning, consuming, borrowing, saving, investing, insuring, understanding risk, and gathering information) by a measure of 38% (AAs/Latinos) to 55% (whites).

Critically, the intersectional link for diverse women of color is even more pronounced as it relates to financial literacy and personal financial success. Women of color score significantly lower on these metrics by a measure of 17% to 26% compared to white women (and even worse compared to men). These gaps show that not only is there a real opportunity for women of color to benefit from financial investment programs and financial literacy initiatives, but that these impacts can be extended greatly to have a larger impact on the American economy generally.

Empowering Women Through Investment (EWI)

News Updates
We believe in promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women in today’s world. One key initiative that we are developing is the opportunity to educate, assist, and financially support younger, especially diverse, women as they learn financial planning and portfolio management. Our objective is to establish a female stock club that focuses on group learning, expansion of financial literacy, and group initiative on making investment decisions.

As a 2019 report from the TIAA Institute and Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center (GFLEC) shows, African Americans constitute 13% and Latinos constitute about 15% of the American population and thus both groups play a critical role in the function, success, and sustainability of the economy in the U.S. today. Yet, compared to whites, African Americans and Latinos score significantly lower on the Personal Finance Index on eight indicators (earning, consuming, borrowing, saving, investing, insuring, understanding risk, and gathering information) by a measure of 38% (AAs/Latinos) to 55% (whites).

Critically, the intersectional link for diverse women of color is even more pronounced as it relates to financial literacy and personal financial success. Women of color score significantly lower on these metrics by a measure of 17% to 26% compared to white women (and even worse compared to men). These gaps show that not only is there a real opportunity for women of color to benefit from financial investment programs and financial literacy initiatives, but that these impacts can be extended greatly to have a larger impact on the American economy generally.